This course explored the history of the modern world since Chinggis Khan and the Mongol Empire. Instead of traveling around the world introducing students to this or that "great civilization," it examined the relations between the cultures and regions that made and make up the world. In tracing the process of globalization, the course paid as much attention to the fragile and discontinuous aspects of the global past as it did to the forces that create interdependency. The course was built on edX, a digital platform that allowed Princeton students to learn and cooperate with learners from all over the world (including organized classes in refugee camps in Kenya and Jordan). Instead of a typical discussion session, I helped students tackle weekly case studies that followed a common theme throughout the semester. One precept focused on Trade and Integration, the other on Science, Medicine, and Global Health


Selected Course Evaluations:

  • "Mr. Patrick De Oliveira did a wonderful job guiding us on how to answer the questions to the weekly assignments. He helped clarify the material as well and helped us think about the weekly question and readings in a different light."
  • "Helpful, insightful, and patient."
  • "Patrick is a wonderful teacher."

Beauvais Manufactory, Tapestry: Les Astronomes from L'Histoire de l'empereur de la Chine Series, ca. 1697-1705 (The J. Paul Getty Museum).